Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC, Central Maryland's only dog sledding operation.  Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC offers Boy Scout and Girl Scout activities, educational dog sledding tours, and dog sled programs near Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, and Washington, DC.
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Sobo sleeps during the pull clinic
Sobo tried to sleep through the clinic.
Humans watch while the dogs frolic during a pull clinic in Monkton, Maryland.

Offseason is a time for rest and relaxation for mushers and sled dogs.
What is the most important command for dog powered sports?

It depends a little on who you ask, but most people would either answer "line out" or "on by".

"Line out" is important because if your dog does not stay out in front, it's tough to get going down the trail. If your dog does not line out, then you have to keep getting off the rig, bike, scooter, or sled and correcting them. If your dog lines out on command, then you can actually start to work on some of the moving commands. "Line out" is a command that can be worked on at home, at the park, or even during a Orioles game. If your dog already knows obedience commands, feel free to use the "stay" command in lieu of the "line out" command.

"On By" is one of the most important commands once you start down the trail. Dogs can be easily distracted while running down a trail and the "on by" command is about moving beyond those distractions. On many of the trails in Maryland, there is a lot of other trail traffic, death defying squirrels, and almost domesticated deer. "On by" is essential to avoid having your team chase the local wildlife through the wildflowers.

Below, two dog teams can be seen doing a head on pass at the Tug Hill Challenge dog sled race in upstate New York. These mushers are using the "on by" command to take their dogs "on by" another dog team. For a list of other frequently used dog sledding commands, see our dog sledding commands section.

On By is important for passing other dog teams.

Contact Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC by phone or email

Phone:
(443) 562-5736

Email:
catherine@marylanddogsledding.com

Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC is a micro mushing educational program provider in Baltimore, Maryland.
Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC is a micro mushing educational program provider in Baltimore, Maryland.

Group Pull Training Clinics and Dog Powered Sports Clinics

Maryland Sled Dog Adventures LLC occasionally offers Pull Training Clinics and Dog Powered Sports Clinics as an opportunity to learn about dog powered sports, dog sledding, and dryland dog sledding. Pull training clinics are group lessons that focus on the important ground work skills needed for dog powered sports. Dog Powered Sports clinics focus on Dog Powered Sports appropriate for one to two dog household such as dog scootering, skijoring, bikejoring, and canicross. To see whether there are any upcoming pull clinics scheduled, please check the Upcoming Events section of our home page.


October 17, 2009: Dog Powered Sports Clinic
The October clinc was a great success in spite of some very wet weather due to a massive nor'easter. The seven participants and their dogs were able to learn about the equipment required for dog sledding and the fundamental training required for dog powered sports. Participants and their dogs were able to try their hand (and dog) with a dog scooter and two different dryland dog sledding rigs.

Additional pictures from the Clinic are available on our Webshots gallery.

Beavy of dogs and dog powered sports equipment Fritz Dyck 3 and 4 wheeled carts
A bevy of dogs and dog powered sports equipment.


The participants were able to see and learn about the Fritz Dyck three wheel and four wheel carts.


Bonnie practices hide and go seek. Wolfie waits patiently
Bonnie practices a little hide-and-go-seek.

Wolfie waits patiently (or was he tempted by Anna's apple - cinnamon muffin?)

Is this dog powered sports? Trish tries the scooter
I thought dogs were part of dog powered sports? Trish tries out the Pawtrekker scooter.

May 31, 2008: Pull Training Clinic
The Spring pull training clinic focused on the ground training required for dog powered sports. Participants ere able to learn how to teach their dog to line out, to pull consistently using a double snap leash approach, and to avoid distractions through drag training.

A Siberian Husky demonstrates basic dog sledding commands. Samoyed puppy practices for dog powered sports.
Pearl demonstrates a perfect line out.

Additional pictures from the Clinic are available on our Webshots gallery.
This furry Samoyed puppy liked the ground work and is looking forward to more dog powered sports.


This English Mastiff came up from Virginia to learn about dog powered sports. This northern Virginia based Siberian Husky looked forward to dog powered sports.
Griffen, the English Mastiff, rested during the discussion of dog powered sports. This Siberian husky was remarkably attentive.
Catherine and Sobo demonstrate command training in Northern Baltimore county. Alaskan Malamute waits for pull training.
Catherine and Sobo demonstrate command training.

Nanook, an Alaskan Malamute, waits patiently for the pull training to begin.
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